August 6, 2007

COUNTING HABU


#24 : A20-2/22 : 3mm-80cm : 161 reduced x 44 : 1 - 154 : 80%

I could technically leave that as it is and continue on my merry way, but I'm sure I would leave behind a lot of confusion.
Numbers are clarity. Control. Legitimate definitions of conclusion. You cannot argue with numbers, and I find a lot of solice within the mathematical process of putting things together. Numbers make sense. Anyone who has read a Setsuko Torii pattern, and in turn japanese knit patterns, will know the entire knitting process is reduced down to numbers seperated by hyphens. Extraneous detail stripped. It makes for a very neat, legible, and for me - highly visual - way of pattern writing, and in turn, pattern recognition/materialisation. Allow the process to manufacture itself. I love that.

To Clarity:

Habu Kit 24 Silk Stainless Steel Jacket in 2 threads of black and navy silk wrapped stainless steel. Knit on 3mm needles, 80cm long, Addi Turbo Bamboo [switching to bamboo has made a huge difference to the statistical weighting of Speed:Fear Of Loosing Stitches ratio]. 161 stitches now reduced by 44 with clever shaping. Currently working on the 1st piece, the back, and now on row 154 which means I am approx. 80% complete on this section.

And enjoying that connection of intimacy I have with something for me, that I have wanted to make for years, made out of a product I love, and from a company and designer I have enormous respect for. That place where your head seeks ahead the next stitch:row:pattern:marking and you find fluidity and rhythm and everything begins a low hum of concurrence - a place of zoned participation hand:eye:heart. And now I just want the molten fibre to melt and drip from my needles - because that's exactly how it feels and photographs, as a molten metallic fabric.



[The original version of this post was posted on 6.5st August 2nd 2007. Different photos, and some additional ones have been added here].

1 comment:

Olgajazzy said...

Alison,
love your post, and love the explanation to the muggles. I was telling the customer toda y how smart Japanese patterns are written and read, saving words and pages of paper!
Dying to see your result!!